One of the great things about Britain is its sheer diversity. And if you are looking for a touring destination in your motorhome, Scotland has all of those contrasts – in landscape, geography, history and culture – in spades.

If you’ve been in any doubt about that fact, you might want to consider the 12 good reasons offered by none other than National Geographic for visiting Scotland.

But let’s pick our own top five favourite locations for touring in your motorhome.

1. The Western Highlands

There is no other part of the British Isles that offers the rugged majesty of mountains and coastline as the Western Highlands of Scotland.

Start your drive from the lowlands of Glasgow and you’ll soon find yourself skirting iconic Loch Lomond for your first taste of the mountains, deep waters and gentler landscape of the Trossachs National Park.

As you drive north and west, however, the scenery becomes decidedly more rugged and spectacular, to Oban, the gateway to the Western Isles, Fortwilliam and the chilling atmosphere of Glencoe.

Ease yourself into the adventure with a first night’s stop at one of the well-equipped campsites especially for motorhomes at Loch Lomond.

2. The sunshine coast

For an altogether different perspective on the contrasts Scotland has to offer, you might aim for a longer drive and drive along the country’s north-eastern seaboard or “sunshine coast” as it is also known.

The beaches here are sufficiently remote to remain unspoilt, with the town of Moray and the village of Lossiemouth recording some of the driest weather in Scotland.

Right by the sea at Lossiemouth is the Silver Sands Holiday Park where you will find a grassy or hardstanding pitch to spend a night or two before continuing your tour.

The Moray coast is also a spot where you may be able to see one of nature’s great phenomena – the Northern Lights!

3. Edinburgh

No trip to Scotland is likely to be complete without a visit to its capital, Edinburgh – and the centre of all things cultural.

The height of the season, of course, is August, when the city plays host to the world-renowned Edinburgh Festival of established and rising fringe theatre and comedy. Depending on your tastes, therefore, you might want or not want to avoid this time of the year.

The Caravan and Motorhome Club’s Edinburgh campsite is ideally situated for city visits, yet outside the busiest areas, in a more peaceful spot along the Firth of Forth.

4. Ayrshire and Arran

Your tour of Scotland doesn’t need to involve a long drive. Hop just across the border into the tranquil rolling countryside in the southwest of the country and you may enjoy the perfect motorhome tour around Ayrshire and Arran.

You’ll find yourself in the heartland of Robert Burns place of birth, with a host of quaint countryside towns, sandy beaches – and golf courses galore, with some 50 from which to choose. Indeed, you might even venture as far as Turnberry – the golf course owned by a certain President of the United States.

Since you are driving your own home away from home, though, avoid the huge expense of staying at Turnberry’s centrepiece and instead park up for a night or two at Ayr Craigie Gardens Caravan Club Site, which is just a short way up the coast and offers up to 90 pitches for motorhomes and caravans.

5. Scottish borders

For a similarly quick hop across the border, but on the eastern side of the country, you might instead make your base in Jedburgh and tour these equally quiet and picturesque roads of the borderlands.

Jedburgh itself is a pretty market town and the distance by road from Newcastle upon Tyne is only 56 miles (91.58 km), which takes around one hour and 10 minutes to drive.

Just four miles south of Jedburgh itself, situated on the quiet banks of the River Jed, you’ll find Jedwater Caravan Park in the heart of perfect walking and horse riding countryside – and even enjoy a 10% discount on parking your motorhome if you are a Senior Citizen.

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